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About Us

Mission . . .

To identify and increase awareness of evolving Native elder health and social issues.


Vision . . .

To empower Native people to develop community based solutions.

The National Resource Center on Native American Aging is committed to identifying Native elder health and social issues. Through education, training, and technical assistance, we assist in developing community-based solutions to improve the quality of life and delivery of related support services to the Native aging population.

Overview

Native American elders have many of the same needs as other elder populations; however services to address these needs remain unavailable, underdeveloped or inaccessible in most Native American communities. Native elders comprise a rapidly growing population in the United States. Empowerment of Native American leaders and service providers is crucial to the elders’ health and well-being. Providing high-quality services, while maintaining the individual’s cultural values, will enhance the elders’ self-perception, worth and dignity.

The National Resource Center on Native American Aging serves the elderly Native American population of the United States. The three centers are committed to increasing awareness of issues affecting American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian elders. We are a voice and advocate for their concerns. Through education, training, technical assistance, and research the center assists in developing community-based solutions to improve the quality of life and delivery of support services to this aging population.

History

Since 1994 the Administration on Aging (AoA), through a cooperative agreement, has funded the National Resource Center on Native American aging. It is located in the Center for Rural Health, at The University of North Dakota, in Grand Forks. In 2003 the National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Elders opened in Anchorage, Alaska; and in 2006 Hā Kūpuna (National Resource Center for Native Hawaiian Elders) opened in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Alan AlleryRemembering Alan Allery

Alan J. Allery, M.Ed., MHA, Ph.D. is a fallen member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Prior to his passing, he was an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at the Center for Rural Health, the Principal Investigator and Director of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging, and the Director of Student Health Services at the University of North Dakota (UND). His experience included 30 years of work with American Indian people (15 years with the Indian Health Service in various capacities and 15 years with UND developing numerous projects).